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TENNESSEE CROP AND CATTLE REPORT – MAY 18, 2020

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In West Tennessee, producers made progress planting corn, cotton, and soybeans in drier areas. They were still waiting for low-lying areas to dry, however. Farmers were also busy applying herbicides and fertilizer to emerged crops.

In Middle Tennessee, producers were also busy planting field crops. A few producers started their first cuttings of hay, even though conditions were less than ideal. Some livestock producers reported lower hay yields and poorer pasture quality due to the recent cold snap. Very little significant damage was reported, though.

In East Tennessee, the cutting and baling of hay was the main activity. The condition of vegetable crops improved with warmer, drier weather. Unfortunately, the warmer temperatures came too late for some vegetable producers whose crops sustained damage during the previous week’s cold. There were 4.5 days suitable for field work. Subsoil moisture was rated 1 percent short, 72 percent adequate and 27 percent surplus. Topsoil moisture was rated 1 percent short, 68 percent adequate, and 31 percent surplus.

CROP PROGRESS

Corn (planted) – 79 percent this week, 67 percent last week

Corn (emerged) – 60 percent this week, 44 percent last week

Cotton (planted) – 23 percent this week, 10 percent last week

Soybeans (planted) – 29 percent this week, 20 percent last week

Soybeans (emerged) – 14 percent this week, 6 percent last week

Wheat (headed) – 99 percent this week, 92 percent last week

Wheat (coloring) – 16 percent this week

CROP CONDITIONS

Pasture – 5 percent poor, 27 percent fair, 55 percent good and 13 percent excellent

Winter Wheat – 2 percent very poor, 3 percent poor, 34 percent fair, 47 percent good and 14 percent excellent

CATTLE REPORT

Compared to last week, feeder steers were mostly 3.00-5.00 higher, and feeder heifers were 2.00-4.00 higher with good demand for all feeder classes. The best demand continues to be for long-weaned, preconditioned cattle. Slaughter cows were 2.00-4.00 higher, and slaughter bulls mostly steady to 3.00 higher with good demand for slaughter classes. Supply included: 79% Feeder Cattle (39% Steers, 0% Dairy Steers, 39% Heifers, 22% Bulls); 11% Slaughter Cattle (0% Heifers, 86% Cows, 14% Bulls); 10% Replacement Cattle (1% Stock Cows, 51% Bred Cows, 2% Bred Heifers, 45% Cow-Calf Pairs, 1% Heifer Pairs, 1% Bulls). Feeder cattle supply over 600 lbs was 34%.


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