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THESE CARS ARE MOST LIKELY TO LAST 200,000 MILES

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Cars, trucks and SUVs you could drive for 200,000 miles used to be a rarity. Now thousands of them are on the road, some even sold as used cars. Can your car make it that far?

A new study by used-car listing site iSeeCars.com reveals what vehicles are most likely to last that long. The top 10 list is dominated by large SUVs from Toyota, Ford and General Motors.

Increases in manufacturing quality in the last decade have contributed to more vehicles lasting for 200,000 miles or beyond. “Car makers are making better vehicles, and that’s a factor in the increasing longevity,” said iSeeCars CEO Phong Ly.

To measure that longevity, iSeeCars.com analyzed data from 13.5 million used cars sold in 2017. Topping the list of long-lasting vehicles was the Toyota Sequoia large SUV, of which 6.6 percent of those sold had 200,000 miles or more on the odometer. That’s 5.5 times the 1.2 percent average for all vehicles that made it to 200,000 miles in the study.

The second and third finishers, Ford Expedition and Chevrolet Suburban, both were more than four times as likely to hit the 200,000-mile mark as the average vehicle. In addition to large SUVs, the Toyota Tacoma pickup, Toyota Avalon sedan and Honda Odyssey minivan made the top 10.

In a separate listing excluding SUVs, Toyota Avalon came first with 2.4 percent of those sold passing the mileage benchmark. Other sedans on this list included Honda Accord, Ford Taurus, Toyota Camry, Chevrolet Impala, Toyota Prius and Nissan Maxima. Three minivans – Honda Odyssey, Toyota Sienna and Chrysler Pacifica – also made the non-SUV list.

The Toyota Prius’ appearance on the list is a testament to the longevity of this gas-electric hybrid. “This helps dispel the concerns about its reliability and battery durability,” said Ly.

To get an idea of the market for these long-running vehicles, here are a couple of current examples for sale. A 2006 Toyota Sequoia with 219,348 miles is priced at $5,995. The owner of a 2007 Toyota Avalon with 203,857 miles is asking $5,000.

Your car, SUV or pickup may never hit 200,000 miles. But if you want to keep it running as long as possible – certainly past 100,000 miles – follow these tips from car care experts:

  • Follow the prescribed maintenance schedule. This may seem obvious, but busy car owners often overlook these recommended intervals for oil changes and other maintenance.
  • Find a good mechanic. An independent shop will save you money vs. a dealership, especially once your new-car warranty has expired. See if your area has any AAA-certified mechanics.
  • Get in some highway driving. Short trips consisting of stop-and-go driving are hard on a vehicle. If you habitually make only a short commute or brief trips for errands, take the car out and drive at highway speeds every few weeks.

Every year you can keep your vehicle running well is a year you aren’t making payments on its replacement.

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