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CCHS AND ROANE COUNTY HIGH TEACHERS NAMED TO TENNESSEE EDUCATOR FELLOWSHIP

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The State Collaborative on Reforming Education (SCORE) announced today that 50 educators have been chosen for the 2017-18 class of the Tennessee Educator Fellowship and two are from the area.

Kimberly Herring teaches grades 10th -12th in math at Cumberland County High School in Crossville. Herring has been teaching for 27 years. Sarah Johnson teaches science in grades 10th -12th at Roane County High School in Kingston. Johnson has been teaching for five years.

The Tennessee Educator Fellowship is a yearlong program that equips educators to advocate for their students and their profession as they continue teaching. Entering its fourth year, the fellowship now accepts not only teachers but also school counselors and librarians. Since 2014, the fellowship has helped nearly 100 teachers to contribute to the discussion about education policy by appearing at public speaking engagements, inviting policymakers into their classrooms, writing about their education experience in state and national publications, creating regional professional networks, and serving on state-level policy committees.

The fellows chosen for 2017-18 have combined teaching experience of 583 years, ranging from three years in the classroom to almost 50. These Tennessee Educator Fellows represent elementary, middle, and high schools in 35 districts across East, Middle, and West Tennessee. The members of the cohort teach English language arts, math, science, social studies, visual arts, career and technical education, and special education, and serve as librarians and school counselors in urban, suburban, and rural schools.

This is the fourth year of the Tennessee Educator Fellowship. Past fellows have led new education initiatives including a new summer reading program through Read to be Ready; Project LIT Community, an initiative to eliminate book deserts in Nashville; and professional development and leadership programs for other teachers. Fellows also have informed education conversations at local, state, and national levels through in-person meetings with various stakeholders and op-eds for news and education outlets like The Tennessean, Education Post, and Hechinger Report
The new fellows will meet as a group for the first time in July. Throughout the upcoming year, the educator fellows will learn through in-person and online seminars and will serve as liaisons between their colleagues, their communities, and policymakers as Tennessee continues the work of improving educational outcomes for all students.